Posted on: April 10, 2021 Posted by: MK Comments: 0
Vitamin B

The importance of Vitamin B Complex to the health of the nervous system can hardly be overestimated.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) is involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major component of the membranes surrounding nerve cells. Insufficient intake and/or utilisation of vitamin B2 will result in nerve degeneration and impaired memory formation as well as defects in sensory perception leading to impairment and deterioration in peripheral vision.

The role of vitamin B3 (Niacin) is crucial since it participates in a variety of enzymatic reactions linked to energy production, neurotransmitter synthesis and brain function. It also assists with maintaining healthy skin, hair, mucous membranes and sweat glands. Niacin deficiency can lead to pellagra – a disease marked by severe neurological complications such as anxiety, depression and hallucinations, anorexia nervosa (loss or appetite for food), insomnia and delirium. Inadequate intake may lead to neurological disorders involving the autonomic nervous system such as impotence or increased frequency of urination among men who have been sexually active. Deficiency has also been linked with rheumatoid arthritis because it affects prostaglandins which play a vital role in protecting joints from damage caused by inflammation

Vitamin B5 – Pantothenic Acid (Pantethine) plays an important role by serving as coenzyme A involved in numerous biochemical reactions required for synthesizing compounds like carbohydrates from sugar or fat metabolism; protein building blocks such as amino acids; hormone hormones including adrenaline; hemoglobin that carries oxygen through our blood; steroid hormones like cholesterol; antistress compounds called catecholamines which are produced when we are stressed out which helps maintain proper functioning balance between heart rate & blood pressure etc… Individuals who are deficient tend develop muscle cramps & spasms along with other manifestations associated with stress including high levels of blood pressure & fast heart rate that may lead to fatal conditions if left untreated!!

The following foods are rich in Vitamin B and are beneficial to your health

Pumpkin, sweet potatoes, spinach, apricots, nectarines and papaya are all good sources of Vitamin B1.

Folic acid is essential for the production of red blood cells and the division of cells. It also helps to metabolize protein into amino acids which your body needs for growth and repair. Good sources include asparagus, green leafy vegetables like spinach and broccoli. Also brewer’s yeast contains a large amount of folic acid (60%). You should take folic acid before conception to prevent neural tube defects in your baby such as spina bifida.

Good sources of Vitamin B6 include bananas, lentils pumpkin seeds/pepitas which contain high amounts that are easily absorbed by the body! Also foods containing 100mg or more per portion are ideal e.g. bananas (1 medium), peanuts (100g), dried figs(30g) and lentils (300g).

Vitamin B1

The B vitamins are water soluble and are essential for normal growth and health. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) is the most widely distributed of all vitamins in a variety of foods.

Thiamine plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism and is essential for energy production. Thiamine helps convert carbohydrates into glucose, the body’s main source of fuel.

In the absence of thiamine, the body cannot metabolize carbohydrates efficiently, causing low energy levels, fatigue, and irritability. Thiamine also plays a vital role in the functioning of the nervous system, and helps maintain the integrity of the membranes of nerve cells.

Thiamine deficiency is rare in healthy people but may occur in people who abuse alcohol or are on a low carbohydrate diet. Thiamine deficiency can also occur in people with a genetic disorder called Beriberi.

Symptoms of Thiamine Deficiency

Thiamine deficiency symptoms are neurological. They may include:

  • weakness and fatigue
  • difficulty walking
  • muscle weakness
  • difficulty with eye movements
  • blurred vision
  • tremor
  • memory loss
  • numbness or tingling
  • depression
  • irritability
  • insomnia
  • poor concentration
  • difficulty walking

Beriberi – a disease caused by a deficiency of thiamine

Beriberi is the name given to a group of symptoms that occur when the body is deficient in thiamine (vitamin B1). The thiamine (B1) deficiency occurs because the person has a diet low in thiamine, or because a person’s body has difficulty absorbing thiamine from the digestive tract.

Beriberi may occur in people who are on a low carbohydrate diet or who abuse alcohol. People with diabetes are at risk for developing thiamine deficiency because of their inability to absorb nutrients through the digestive tract.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Riboflavin is involved in the production of energy and growth of cells.

Riboflavin plays a key role in the production of energy and growth of cells. It is essential for the body’s production of red blood cells, and for the normal functioning of the nervous system.

Riboflavin occurs naturally in a variety of foods including milk, meat, eggs, and green vegetables.

Riboflavin deficiency is rare in the United States, but may occur in people who abuse alcohol, and in people with anorexia or bulimia.

Riboflavin deficiency symptoms include swelling of the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat, cracks in the corners of the mouth, cracks in the corners of the mouth, and painful sores on the lips and tongue.

Symptoms of Riboflavin Deficiency

Riboflavin deficiency may cause:

  • mouth sores
  • muscle weakness
  • fatigue and irritability
  • loss of appetite

Ariboflavinosis – Ariboflavinosis is a condition caused by a deficiency of riboflavin. Ariboflavinosis is characterized by cracked lips and sores in the corners of the mouth.

Symptoms of Ariboflavinosis

Symptoms of riboflavin deficiency include:

  • cracks in the corners of the mouth
  • cracked lips
  • redness of the tongue
  • swelling of the tongue
  • sores in the mouth
  • swelling of the mucous membranes
  • Yellow tongue

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Niacin is involved in the production of energy and the proper functioning of the nervous system.

Niacin plays a key role in the production of energy from carbohydrates and the breakdown of fats and protein. It also plays an important role in the production of sex hormones, and in the maintenance of a healthy nervous system.

Foods high in niacin include meat, fish, poultry, and whole grains. Niacin is also available in vitamin supplements.

Niacin deficiency occurs in both developed and developing countries. A deficiency of niacin may lead to scurvy, a disease that causes soft gums, bleeding from the gums, and skin rashes.

Niacin deficiency symptoms include:

  • skin rashes
  • decreased appetite
  • itching
  • difficulty sleeping
  • feeling tired
  • fever
  • headache
  • diarrhea
  • sore throat
  • scurvy – a disease caused by a deficiency of niacin. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding from the gums and skin rashes.

Symptoms of Scurvy

A person with scurvy is often anemic, has a swollen, inflamed tongue, and displays a loss of appetite. If not treated, scurvy can cause death.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

Pantothenic acid helps convert carbohydrates into glucose and is essential for the body’s production of red blood cells.

Pantothenic acid plays a key role in the production of energy from carbohydrates, and in the breakdown of fats and protein. It is also essential for the production of red blood cells, and for the maintenance of a healthy nervous system.

Pantothenic acid is widely distributed in most foods. Good sources of pantothenic acid include whole grains, broccoli, avocado, chicken, fish, and liver.

Pantothenic acid deficiency is rare in healthy people.

Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Pantothenic acid deficiency is rare in healthy people. However, it may occur in people who abuse alcohol, and in people with anorexia or bulimia.

Symptoms of Pantothenic Acid Deficiency

Symptoms of pantothenic acid deficiency include:

  • fatigue
  • weakness
  • irritability
  • loss of appetite
  • nervousness
  • cracks in the corners of the mouth

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

Pyridoxine helps the body convert protein and carbohydrates into energy. It also helps regulate the nervous system, and produces antibodies to fight infection.

Pyridoxine is involved in the conversion of proteins and carbohydrates into energy. It is also involved in the regulation of the nervous system, and in the production of antibodies to fight infection.

Pyridoxine occurs in a variety of foods, including whole grains, liver, fish, and poultry. It is also available in vitamin supplements.

Pyridoxine deficiency is rare in the United States, but may be more common in alcoholics.

Symptoms of Pyridoxine Deficiency

A pyridoxine deficiency may cause:

  • anemia
  • irregular heart rhythms
  • nervousness
  • depression
  • irritability
  • memory loss
  • poor concentration
  • reduced muscle tone
  • twitching

Pyridoxine deficiency may cause:

  • anemia
  • irregular heart rhythms
  • nervousness
  • depression
  • irritability
  • memory loss
  • poor concentration
  • reduced muscle tone
  • twitching

Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

Biotin is a water soluble vitamin required for the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein. It also plays a role in the metabolism of many amino acids and lipids (fats).

Biotin is involved in the breakdown of fats and carbohydrates into energy. It also plays a role in the metabolism of proteins, and in gluconeogenesis, the synthesis of glucose from amino acids and glycerol.

Biotin is found in a variety of foods, including liver, egg yolks, whole grains, and yeast. Biotin is also available in vitamin supplements.

Biotin deficiency is rare in the United States. It may occur in people who abuse alcohol, and in people with anorexia or bulimia.

Symptoms of Biotin Deficiency

Biotin deficiency may cause:

  • nervousness
  • depression
  • irritability
  • memory loss
  • poor concentration
  • reduced muscle tone
  • biotinidase deficiency – A deficiency of biotinidase, an enzyme that breaks down biotin, causes a biotin deficiency. Symptoms of biotin deficiency include depression, fatigue, irritability, and memory loss.

Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)

Folic acid is involved in the production of red blood cells, and in the production of DNA.

Folic acid is an important part of the process responsible for the production of red blood cells, and for the production of DNA.

Folic acid is found in a variety of foods, including liver, kidney, yeast, whole grains, and green vegetables. It is also available in vitamin supplements.

Folic acid deficiency is rare in the United States. It may occur in people who abuse alcohol, and in people with anorexia or bulimia.

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